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Graduate School Course Catalog by Category

Course Number Code

CAP   Capstone Projects

CDL    Cognitively Diverse Learner

EXA    Experiential Application (including Practicum and Internships)

IEC      Innovative Education & Curriculum

IEL      Innovative Educational Leadership

RES    Applied Research

SEM   Seminar

 

CDL 511 = COGNITIVELY DIVERSE LEARNER

LEVEL 5 , YEAR 1, SEQUENCE #1

 

Area Level Year Sequence
CDL 5* 1 1

*5= Foundation Graduate Course

*6 & *7 =Advanced Graduate Course

 

A.   Cognitively Diverse Learner

 

CDL 511: Introduction to Cognitively Diverse Minds: A World of Learning Differences and Their Impact on Learning & Behavior (Certificate Program)

This course offers an exploration on how minds differ by looking at the cognitive diversity movement and the implications of cognitive differences among students with respect to intellectual profiles, learning styles, personality preferences. Special emphasis is given on how diverse minds struggle in some areas but bring strengths and advanced abilities to others. An examination of learning and where it breaks down for exceptional students often falling under the umbrella of Special Education will reveal how cognitive differences impact learning. Candidates will critique categories of special education and resulting approaches typically found in individual educational plans. 3 credits

 

CDL 511: Introduction to Cognitively Diverse Minds: A World of Learning Differences and Their Impact on Learning and Behavior (M.Ed. Program)

This course offers an exploration on how minds differ by looking at the cognitive diversity movement and the implications of cognitive differences among students with respect to intellectual profiles, learning styles, personality preferences. Special emphasis is given on how diverse minds struggle in some areas but bring strengths and advanced abilities to others. An examination of learning and where it breaks down for exceptional students often falling under the umbrella of Special Education will reveal how cognitive differences impact learning. Candidates will critique categories of special education and resulting approaches typically found in individual educational plans. 3 credits

 

CDL 511: Introduction to Cognitively Diverse Minds: A World of Learning Differences and Their Impact on Learning and Behavior (Ed.D. Program)

This course offers an exploration on how minds differ by looking at the cognitive diversity movement and the implications of cognitive differences among students with respect to intellectual profiles, learning styles, personality preferences. Special emphasis is given on how diverse minds struggle in some areas but bring strengths and advanced abilities to others. An examination of learning and where it breaks down for exceptional students often falling under the umbrella of Special Education will reveal how cognitive differences impact learning. Candidates will critique categories of special education and resulting approaches typically found in individual educational plans. 3 credits

 

CDL 512: Nature and Needs of Gifted and Talented Learners (Certificate Program)

Course content and activities focus on current research, trends, and practices within the field of gifted and talented education. Topics include an introduction to the historical and philosophical context of gifted education and theories of intelligence; characteristics of gifted behaviors across cultures; overview of curricular options for enhancing and accelerating instruction; and identification techniques and program services. 3 credits

 

CDL 512: Nature and Needs of Gifted and Talented Learners (M.Ed. Program)

Course content and activities focus on current research, trends, and practices within the field of gifted and talented education. Topics include an introduction to the historical and philosophical context of gifted education and theories of intelligence; characteristics of gifted behaviors across cultures; overview of curricular options for enhancing and accelerating instruction; and identification techniques and program services. 3 credits

 

CDL 512: Nature and Needs of Gifted and Talented Learners (Ed.D. Program)

Course content and activities focus on current research, trends, and practices within the field of gifted and talented education. Topics include an introduction to the historical and philosophical context of gifted education and theories of intelligence; characteristics of gifted behaviors across cultures; overview of curricular options for enhancing and accelerating instruction; and identification techniques and program services. 3 credits

 

CDL 513: The Complexities of Twice Exceptionality (Certificate Program)

The focus of the course describes the unique characteristics of students who have high abilities and simultaneous learning and attention challenges known as twice-exceptional students. Particular attention is given to the impact co-incidence has on the social, emotional, and cognitive world of twice-exceptional students. Exploration of the research on this population will illustrate the complexities of both diagnosis and program development for these learners. We will explore how to identify and assess unique learning needs. Using a case study approach, candidates will look at students who are gifted with learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, autism, and social and emotional issues and develop a comprehensive plan to meet their needs. 3 credits

 

CDL 513: The Complexities of Twice Exceptionality (M.Ed. Program)

The focus of the course describes the unique characteristics of students who have high abilities and simultaneous learning and attention challenges known as twice-exceptional students. Particular attention is given to the impact co-incidence has on the social, emotional, and cognitive world of twice-exceptional students. Exploration of the research on this population will illustrate the complexities of both diagnosis and program development for these learners. We will explore how to identify and assess unique learning needs. Using a case study approach, candidates will look at students who are gifted with learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, autism, and social and emotional issues and develop a comprehensive plan to meet their needs. 3 credits

 

CDL 513: The Complexities of Twice Exceptional Students (Ed.D. Program)

The focus of the course describes the unique characteristics of students who have high abilities and simultaneous learning and attention challenges known as twice-exceptional students. Particular attention is given to the impact co-incidence has on the social, emotional, and cognitive world of twice-exceptional students. Exploration of the research on this population will illustrate the complexities of both diagnosis and program development for these learners. We will explore how to identify and assess unique learning needs. Using a case study approach, candidates will look at students who are gifted with learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, autism, and social and emotional issues and develop a comprehensive plan to meet their needs.   3 credits

 

CDL 621: Social and Emotional Diversity: Understanding the Social and Emotional Issues of Twice-Exceptional Learners (Ed.D.)

Exploration of the biological and environmental factors contributing to cognitive diversity with an emphasis on the social and emotional implications for the twice-exceptional individual in the classroom and in life is the focus of this course. The course will include a broad overview of most prevalent categories of special education in order to provide the foundation for advanced conceptualization. Through a case study approach, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how their social and emotional challenges impact interpersonal relationships, academic performance, and ability to attain personal goals. The concepts of motivation, resilience, and grit will be considered in the context of this population. Students will be able to apply this multifaceted social-emotional model for maximizing individual growth, development, and achievement. 3 credits

 

 

CLD 703: Mindfulness Theory and Its Application to the 2e Student

Mindfulness is a mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations. In recent years, mindfulness has become a cornerstone of many therapeutic interventions with a variety of populations. This course will explore the benefits of mindfulness for a 2e population. In general, the benefits of mindfulness include stress reduction, greater focus, emotional balance and enhanced cognitive flexibility. These areas of emotional regulation are often problematic for 2e children and adolescents; therefore, we will examine the different styles of mindfulness and their applications to various 2e populations in order to achieve the aforementioned benefits within this group. In addition, the interface between mindfulness and resilience will be explored. There is considerable evidence indicating that mindfulness techniques lead to greater resilience which in turn leads to greater overall success for the individual. We will examine that research and its applications to the 2e population.     3 credits

 

CDL 731 / IEC 731; Talent Development for Diverse Minds: Programs and Strategies

This course will provide a more critical understanding of models purposefully designed to develop specific kinds of talents and creative abilities in students. Based on knowledge of different kinds of minds (artistic, creative, scientific), candidates will identify programs that align to the way these individuals see the world. A survey of specific programs both in and outside of the school environment will reveal authentic opportunities for talent development. Attention will be paid to their authenticity to the discipline and to the kinds of minds typically aligned to expertise and creative productivity in varied disciplines. A major requirement will be interviews with creators from different disciplines. 3 credits

 

CDL 700; Independent Study

Topics for exploration are decided between the candidate and the advisor relating to specific area of interest in cognitive diverse learners. 1- 6 credits

B. Innovative Education & Curriculum

 

IEC 511: Cognitive Diversity and Strength-Based, Talent-Focused Education

This course provides candidates with an overview of strength-based, talent-focused education with particular attention given to how students differ and the strengths and talents they bring to the classroom. Candidates will gain skills in identifying and using students’ strengths, interests, and talents to help cognitively diverse students succeed in the classroom, develop executive function, social skills, and productivity. Understandings will conclude with procedures for curriculum development using a strength-based, talent-focused model. 3 credits

 

IEC 511: Cognitive Diversity and Strength-Based, Talent-Focused Education (M. Ed. Program)

This course provides candidates with an overview of strength-based, talent-focused education with particular attention given to how students differ and the strengths and talents they bring to the classroom. Candidates will gain skills in identifying and using students’ strengths, interests, and talents to help cognitively diverse students succeed in the classroom, develop executive function, social skills, and productivity. Understandings will conclude with procedures for curriculum development using a strength-based, talent-focused model. 3 credits

 

IEC 511: Cognitive Diversity and Strength-Based, Talent-Focused Education (Ed.D program)

This course provides candidates with an overview of strength-based, talent-focused education with particular attention given to how students differ and the strengths and talents they bring to the classroom. Candidates will gain skills in identifying and using students’ strengths, interests, and talents to help cognitively diverse students succeed in the classroom, develop executive function, social skills, and productivity. Understandings will conclude with procedures for curriculum development using a strength-based, talent-focused model. 3 credits

 

IEC 621: Foundations of Creativity (M.Ed.)

The major purpose of this course is to study the theoretical and practical aspects of creativity—what is creativity, how do we develop it in ourselves and in our students. The course is an overview of major definitions, theories, and research related to the study of creativity and the creative individual. Class members will learn techniques for stimulating creative thinking, as well as strategies for adapting existing curricula to develop creative thinking abilities in students. Topics also include the assessment of creative thinking, methods for enhancing personal creative abilities, and techniques for examining the creative process. 3 credits

IEC 621: Foundations of Creativity (Ed.D. Program)

The major purpose of this course is to study the theoretical and practical aspects of creativity—what is creativity, how do we develop it in ourselves and in our students. The course is an overview of major definitions, theories, and research related to the study of creativity and the creative individual. Class members will learn techniques for stimulating creative thinking, as well as strategies for adapting existing curricula to develop creative thinking abilities in students. Topics also include the assessment of creative thinking, methods for enhancing personal creative abilities, and techniques for examining the creative process. Students will be required to generate their own theory of creativity from studying 21st Century creators. 3 credits

IEC 622: Innovative Uses for Technology in the Classroom for Cognitively Diverse Learners

An introduction to the integration of technology in the schools focusing on how instructional technology affects and advances K-12 learning especially for students who have challenges accessing information, organizing ideas, and communicating what they know. Topics include principles of integrating technology to strengthen standards-based curricula, instruction, and assessment; selection of software and other technological materials; uses of technology for collaboration with school-related audiences; issues of digital equity and ethics; and strategies for using digital technology with special needs populations. 3 credits

 

IEC 731 / CDL 731: Talent Development for Diverse Minds: Programs and Strategies

This course will provide a more critical understanding of models purposefully designed to develop specific kinds of talents and creative abilities in students. Based on knowledge of the different kinds of minds (artistic, creative, scientific) candidates will identify programs that align to the way these individuals see the world. A survey of specific programs both in and outside of the school environment will reveal authentic opportunities for talent development. Attention will be paid to their authenticity to the discipline and to the kinds of minds typically aligned to expertise and creative productivity in varied disciplines. A major requirement will be interviews with creators from different disciplines. 3 credits

 

IEC 732 / IEL 731: Curriculum Leadership

Curriculum Leadership is the study of theoretical and practical aspects of designing curriculum for advanced students. This course has been designed to familiarize educators with the various theories, principles and models of curriculum development for gifted and talented students. A variety of curricular models will be explored, including the Multiple Menu Model and the Parallel Curriculum Model, which will be used as a framework for developing differentiated and defensible curriculum for gifted students. Additionally, the course will explore curriculum modification techniques, methods for enrichment teaching, and assessment techniques that support the principles underlying curriculum design for advanced students. As a final project, each participant will choose a content area field of study and design a comprehensive unit following best-evidence research in curriculum design for the gifted and aligned to the appropriate state standards or Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

3 credits

IEC 700: Independent Study

Topics for exploration are decided between the candidate and the advisor relating to specific area of interest in cognitive diverse learners. 1- 6 credits

 

C. Innovative Educational Leadership

 

IEL 731: Educational Leadership and Organizational Management Theory for Dynamic Schools

This course introduces theories and approaches to organizational management, utilizing Gareth Morgan’s text Images of Organization to explore and examine a variety of institutional management strategies and approaches. Candidates will also survey important current perspectives of management theory and assess potential impacts of these perspectives for programs in action. Candidates will grapple with Morgan’s organizational metaphors to develop their own perspectives about how to lead and manage an institution with a cognitively diverse population. By the end of the course, students will craft a leadership statement and a strategic plan for program development.

3 credits

 

IEL 732 / IEC 732: Curriculum Leadership

The major purpose of this course is to study the theoretical and practical aspects of designing curriculum for advanced students. This course has been designed to familiarize educators with the various theories, principles and models of curriculum development for gifted and talented students. A variety of curricular models will be explored, including the Multiple Menu Model and the Parallel Curriculum Model, which will be used as a framework for developing differentiated and defensible curriculum for gifted students. Additionally, the course will explore curriculum modification techniques, methods for enrichment teaching, and assessment techniques that support the principles underlying curriculum design for advanced students. As a final project, each candidate will choose a content area field of study and design a comprehensive unit following best-evidence research in curriculum design for the gifted and aligned to the appropriate state standards or Common Core State Standards (CCSS). 3 credits

 

IEL/IEC 733: Creating Strength-Based, Talent-Focused Schools

This course delves deeply into strength-based, talent-focused approaches in schools with cognitively diverse populations. Course material will address major tenants of innovative schools including those who are strength-based philosophy before exploring several models for strength-based programs and explore appropriate models that support this approach. Students will create a vision for an innovative school that is founded on developing creativity, talent, and interests and write a grant proposal to fund it. 3 credits

 

IEL 734: Program Evaluation and Modification

This course introduces theories and approaches to program evaluation, also providing practical models and tools for planning and conducting an evaluations. Candidates will survey a variety of qualitative, descriptive, and inferential methodologies that can be applied in formative and summative evaluation contexts. Candidates will work with logic models to identify information needs, create evaluation questions, and develop a system for data collection, analysis, and reporting. By the end of the course, students will produce a draft of an hypothetical evaluation proposal. 3 credits

 

IEL 700: Independent Study

Topics for exploration are decided between the candidate and the advisor relating to specific area of interest in cognitive diverse learners. 1- 6 credits

D. Experiential Applications

All Practica and internship credits are calculated based on 45 hours per credit unit.

A three-credit course requires 135 work hours.

 

EXA 511: Practicum (Certificate Program)

The Practicum is designed to apply theory and skills from coursework deemed necessary to show emerging expertise in the area of twice exceptional education. The Practicum consists of two parts. Part A is work that is completed prior to summer residency. It consists of preparation for on-campus experience including curriculum development and observations of talent development opportunities. Part B takes place on campus. Candidates will participate in a summer experience at Bridges Academy which will include working with twice-exceptional students in an enriched environment and participating on a multi-disciplinary team using the Multi-Perspectives Model to understand student behaviors and to design curriculum and instruction appropriate to individual needs. Requirements will include adapting IEPs and 504 plans to meet the needs of twice-exceptional learners. Candidates will also develop personalized student talent plans through the use of student contracts. 3 credits

 

EXA 511: Practicum (M.Ed. Program)

The Practicum is designed to apply theory and skills from coursework deemed necessary to show emerging expertise in the area of twice exceptional education. The Practicum consists of two parts. Part A is work that is completed prior to summer residency. It consists of preparation for on-campus experience including curriculum development and observations of talent development opportunities. Part B takes place on campus. Candidates will participate in a 2-week summer experience at Bridges Academy which will include working with twice-exceptional students in an enriched environment and participating on a multi-disciplinary team using the Multi-Perspectives Model to understand student behaviors and to design curriculum and instruction appropriate to individual needs. Requirements will include adapting IEPs and 504 plans to meet the needs of twice-exceptional learners. Candidates will also develop personalized student talent plans through the use of student contracts. 3 credits

 

EXA 600: Clinical Practicum

Doctoral students will engage in a clinical experience under the supervision of an educational therapist and expert in gifted education. The experience will consist of two parts: Part A takes place at student’s home site and consists of two major activities (70 hours). These activities will be done before arriving for their 2nd Residency Experience on campus. Part B is comprised of four activities (65 hours). The goal is to use a case study approach to design effective strength-based interventions for twice-exceptional individuals that address both their talents and challenges. Doctoral students are expected to lead student conferences using the Multi-Perspectives Model for collaboration. 3 credits

 

EXA 800: Doctoral Internship

This Internship is an individually arranged experience in which doctoral students have an opportunity to apply their understandings from coursework into authentic settings in their respective areas of concentration: twice exceptionality and cognitive diversity, strength-based, talent-focused curriculum, or leadership for innovation. Three months prior to the initiation of internship activities, doctoral students develop an internship plan with their internship advisor, and submit an internship contract one month prior to the internship experience. Students register for EXA 800 (3-9 credits) during their first summer of study and must complete a total of 135 hours per three credits.* Hours include onsite responsibilities involved in the internship itself, reading the literature, preparing for internship activities, and preparing internship portfolio. Doctoral students will have an “In Progress” grade until the internship is completed. It is the responsibility of each doctoral student to determine when and where to complete the internship, but Bridges Graduate School faculty will provide guidance and suggestions. The internship could be completed in the Los Angeles, CA area, such as in a school or camp that provides specialized services to students with cognitive diversity or it could be completed in another state or country, for example working with leadership, policy development, or public relations. The experience could begin one summer and continue during the following summers, or the internship activities might occur throughout a calendar year. Possibilities for a residency internship at Bridges Academy, a school for twice-exceptional students is available as well.

 

* Note students can extend their internship to 6 or 9 credits for a more in-depth experience, using those credits as a replacement for one or two elective courses.

 

E. Applied Research and Research Methodology

 

RES 621: Methods and Techniques of Educational Research

This course focuses on teacher as researcher. The content provides strategies to evaluate programs and students for the purpose of conducting action research projects to inform instruction. To that end students will examine basic tools, materials, designs, and statistical techniques used in researching effective methods in the classroom. In addition they will be able to design an action research project and implement it in their classrooms in preparation for the Masters Project (CAP 621: Masters Capstone Project). 3 credits

 

RES 711: Principles of Research Design

This course provides an introduction to the design of research studies in applied educational settings. The design and implementation of research studies is contextualized in current educational issues and takes into account the practical constraints of the real world. Topics covered include the formulation of research questions/hypotheses, operational definitions of research constructs, sampling methods, experimental and quasi-experimental designs, threats to internal and external validity. 3 credits

 

RES 721: Quantitative Methods

This course provides the basis for understanding, applying, and interpreting univariate statistics in educational settings and introduces multiple correlational research. The student will relate specific quantitative research questions and hypotheses to appropriate statistical procedures as well as analyze each procedure using appropriate software. Students will use data sets that apply directly to educational research. 3 credits

 

RES 722: Qualitative Methods

This course conveys the history and characteristics of qualitative methodology used in educational settings. A theoretical and practical examination of qualitative methods will include the use of qualitative research as students gain experience in employing qualitative techniques and analyses.

3 credits

F. Seminars and Capstone Projects

SEM 610: Masters Seminar

The purpose of this culminating seminar is to provide an opportunity for graduate students to grapple with current issues in the field, refine understandings of concept covered in course work and present their capstone research project before faculty and cohort members. 3 credits

 

SEM 710: Doctoral Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to provide an overview of the doctoral program by exploring foundational work in the area of twice exceptional education, neurodiversity and positive psychology. A major focus is how ideas and theories are born and how multiple ideas create new fields of study and practice. Candidates will also begin designing their personalized doctoral program by identifying their personal interests, goals and vision for leadership in the field of Neurodiversity with an emphasis on leadership, curriculum, or talent development. The culminating project for this course is a preliminary plan of study and timeline. The plan will identify personal goals, topics of interest, menu of opportunities, and research and project ideas. 3 credits

 

SEM 720: Doctoral Seminar 2

This course is designed to continue acclimating students to doctoral work and expectations. The primary focus will be on defining an area of interest which will lead to selection of coursework, internship experiences, and the identification of the capstone dissertation project–Problem of Practice Research. Doctoral students will identify a Problem of Practice, which should be a pressing issue from the student’s perspective that affects their professional experience and that is related to one or more of the program’s three areas: cognitive diversity and twice exceptionality, leadership, and strength-based, talent-focused curriculum within in the context of Cognitive Diversity in Education. In addition doctoral students will complete a plan of study and conduct a professional development training session. 3 credits

 

CAP 621: Capstone Project (M.Ed.)

This course is done independently throughout the semester following the completion of RES 621. Participants work on implementing their proposal approved in RES 621. All data must be collected and organized before arriving on campus for Summer Residency 2 when participants will register for CAP 621 In addition their Action Research papers must be written up to the results section. During class students will analyze their data and complete their paper and presentation for the Masters Seminar held week 2 of the Summer Residency prior to graduation ceremony.At the meeting they will analyze their data with their professor and discuss their conclusions. They will then complete their paper and participate in a Master Seminar where they will present their action research project.

3 credits

 

CAP 991: Problem finding: Framing the Problem of Practice, Research Question, and Proposal Development (Ed.D.)

This is the first of a 4-course sequence leading to the completion of the capstone project–Problem of Practice Dissertation.. The course will lead candidates through the initial parts of the proposal: framing the research question(s), writing a critical literature review, determining methodology and procedures, A focus is on the completion of the proposal for Problem of Practice research and setting up a timeline for the implementation phase of the study. 3 credits

 

CAP 992: Directed Research, Part 2: Implementation and Data Collection (Ed.D.)

This is the second of a 4-course sequence leading to the completion of the Capstone Project. A focus is on the completion of the proposal for Problem of Practice research and setting up a timeline for the implementation phase of the study. After successful defense of the proposal and the Human Subjects application candidates focus on implementation and data collection phase of their research design independently in consultation with major advisor. Chapters 1-3 of the dissertation should be approved by the major advisor. 3 credits

 

CAP 993: Directed Research: Data Analysis and Chapters 4-5 (Ed.D.)

This is the third of a 4 course sequence leading to the completion of the problem of practice Research Study. This phase should focus on data analysis and synthesis of findings. The candidate should work with the doctoral committee to flesh out the results and discuss implications. Chapters 4 & 5 should be completed by the end of this phase. 3 credits

 

CAP 994: Directed Research, Part 4: Completion of Problem of Practice, Applied Dissertation and Oral Defense (Ed.D.)

This is the final course of a 4 course sequence leading to the completion of the Problem of Practice, Applied Dissertation and oral defense. This course is completed independently in conjunction with advisor and doctoral committee chair, is designed to support progress toward, dissertation writing, and preparation of an oral dissertation defense. Can be taken twice if more time is needed for completion. 3 credits

 

 

 

CAP 995: Directed Research, Part 4: Completion of Problem of Practice, Applied Dissertation and Oral Defense (Ed.D.)

This is a repeat of CAP 994, if additional time is needed. This is the final course of a 4 course sequence leading to the completion of the Problem of Practice, Applied Dissertation and oral defense. This course is completed independently in conjunction with advisor and doctoral committee chair, is designed to support progress toward, dissertation writing, and preparation of an oral dissertation defense. Can be taken twice if more time is needed for completion. 3 credits